Editor's Picks: Invisible Sharks, Dinos with Big Horns, and More

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If you only have time to read five stories this week, let them be

these five:

5. Mesoamericans Invented

Rubber

Not only did Mesoamericans use natural latex to create rubber, they

figured out how to manufacture different kinds of rubber for different

purposes. Uh, 3,500 years before modern processes were

(re)invented.

Natural latex comes from a tree that grows in Mesoamerica (roughly

Mexico down to Nicaragua). When it's mixed with the juice of morning

glories, Mesoamericans discovered, they could make it as stretchy or

bouncy as they wanted.

A 50-50 latex/morning glory blend produced maximum bounciness,

perfect for rubber balls. Pure latex worked best for rubber bands and

adhesives. A three-to-one mix of latex to morning glory created the

most durable rubber, perfect for sandals.

4. Record-Sized Dino Horns 

Why did dinosaurs accessorize so largely? That's what I want to

know.

A newly found rhino-sized dino had horns that were 4 feet long. The

wonderfully-named Coahuilaceratops magnacuerna, or "great

horned horny face," was extra horny, with a small one on its nose in

addition to the two honkers above its eyes.

The dinosaur probably used its huge horns to attract the ladies and

fight off the competition.

3. Hurricane Could Spread Gulf Spill Far and Wide 

In the bad timing category, I choose hurricane season and oil

spills. A busy hurricane season is predicted, and storms could hit the

Gulf like an immersion blender, mixing the oil down hundreds of meters

and scattering oil three sheets to the wind.

Experts have seen tropical storms move intact globs of oil many

hundreds of miles. They expect the same to happen if hurricanes churn

through the Gulf oil spill, possibly carrying oil as far north as Cape

Cod.

4. Florida Coast: Hot Spot for Shark Attacks

We aim to be helpful here at Discovery News, so here's some news you

can surely use.

Twenty-one percent of shark attacks in the world happen along a

47-mile strip of land in Volusia County, Fla. Maybe don't go swimming

there.

But if you must, don't splash around, wear a black-and-white suit,

or swim on a Sunday, among other things.

You're welcome.

1. Guy Infects Himself with Computer

Virus

It's just one of the creepiest things I've ever heard. A British

researcher managed to introduce a virus into a tiny computer chip in

his body, which THEN infected a computer outside his body with the same

virus.

What's creepy about it? 1. He's micro-chipped. 2. A totally

human-made virus can pass into a person and back out again. 3. He's

micro-chipped.

I agree that it's time I came into the now. And the researcher, Mark

Gasson from the University of Reading in the U.K., said: "By infecting

my own implant with a computer virus we have demonstrated how advanced

these technologies are becoming and also had a glimpse at the problems

of tomorrow."

Uh, chah.

Those were the top five stories I liked most. Now here are the most

popular articles of the past seven days, according to your

clicks:

5. Could Kevin Costner's Machine Work on the Oil

Spill?

Mr. Costner is promoting a machine that uses centrifugal forces to

help clean up oil spills. Is it legit? Yep, it's legit. Just kind of

small.

4. Intergalactic Travel is

Possible

I, for one, am very happy to hear this. All we have to do to escape

our world, once it's, you know, dead, is to be shot out of our galaxy

by the gravitational sling of a black hole! Wait: How does that work,

exactly?

3. Beautiful Supernova Violence

We all know it's better to look good than to feel good. And this

beautiful supernova surely knows the meaning of that, since it ripped

apart 5,000 years ago.

2. Divers Explore Sunken Ruins of Cleopatra's

Palace

Ah Cleopatra, forever evoking beauty and power. Divers are finally

starting to excavate her sunken palace, and coming up with all sorts of

stunning artifacts from around 30 B.C.

1. Sharks Can Become Invisible

As if they weren't scary enough, sharks can be even super-sneakier

than we thought. Some species can emit light, creating an optical illusion that makes them invisible to other creatures.

Which stories were your favorites? Weigh in

below.

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