Serpent-Handling Pastor Killed by Snake: Where Was God?

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A snake-handling preacher who survived nine previous bites succumbed to his final, fatal bite in Kentucky over the weekend.

As CNN reported, Jamie Coots, a Pentecostal believer who stars in a reality show, "Snake Salvation," died Saturday evening. CNN said Coots believed that a passage in the Bible suggests poisonous snakebites will not harm believers as long as they are anointed by God.

Evangelical preachers like Coots not only handle venomous snakes but also engage in other dangerous activities such as drinking poison. They base their faith on Biblical verses in Mark 16: "And these signs will follow those who believe: in My name they will cast out demons; they will speak with new tongues; they will take up serpents; and if they drink anything deadly, it will by no means hurt them; they will lay their hands on the sick, and they will recover."

Pastor Coots and his followers are Biblical literalists, believing that each and every word in the Bible is the true and inerrant word of God. This is a position that Bill Nye "The Science Guy" took creationist Ken Ham to task about during their debate last month, when Nye described the Bible as "verses translated into English over 30 centuries."

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Even assuming that God wrote the Bible through men, all that copying and translating, Nye noted, leaves many opportunity for errors to creep into the verses. Thus the Mark 16 reference to snakes may simply be a metaphor, part of a well-known tradition of depicting Satan or evil in the form of serpents. Many evangelicals, however, take it literally.

The premise behind snake handling is to demonstrate their faith, both to themselves and as an inspiration to others, by doing something dangerous. It just happens to be serpents because of a bible passage, but in theory the same ritual role could be fulfilled by drunk bullfighting or playing Russian roulette.

Seeking medical attention for a snake bite is seen as a lack of faith in God's ability to heal, a belief that can also be found in other religions including Christian Scientists and Scientologists. In many cases children have even died because their devout parents refused to take them to a doctor.

Coots, though well-known because of his high-profile status on a popular television show, is far from alone in this practice. Though not common (and in fact illegal in many places), snake handling at evangelical events occurs on a regular basis. It's not clear how many people have died from it -- since official numbers are not kept and only high-profile deaths such as Coots are likely to make the news -- but the victims likely number in the hundreds.

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Many wonder what effect Coots's death will have on his followers. The most likely answer, surprisingly, is none.

Their religious belief is what in logic is called non-falsifiable; that is, it can't be proven wrong or false. No matter the outcome of snake handling, it's God's will: if he gets bitten and dies, it's fine because God called him home and it was his time to pass, and if he doesn't get bit (or survives the bite) it's because God protected him. It's framed as a win-win situation, so no matter the outcome it reinforces their religious beliefs.

In fact it would be more surprising if Coots's followers' faith was shaken: After all, the whole point of serpent handling is about affirmation of faith; for them to lose faith because of what happened to him would be the ultimate betrayal.

It's not clear whether Jamie Coots's son, Little Cody, will keep up the snake-handling tradition that killed his father, but it seems likely. In 2012 another well-known Pentecostal serpent handler, Mack Wolford, was killed in his West Virginia church after being fatally bitten by one of his snakes. Wolford's father was also a snake handler, and he, also, was killed by a snake in 1983.

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Many greeted this news incredulously: Didn't he learn a lesson from this? The answer is that of course he did; he just learned a lesson that's different than most non-Evangelicals would take from this tragedy. Not that God wanted Wolford to die -- and surely not that God doesn't exist and left Wolford to his own devices when handling venomous snakes -- but instead that Wolford's faith was rewarded in heaven.

While some have found dark humor in the irony of Coots's death, the fact is that religious beliefs, like all other beliefs, have consequences. Coots, like religious zealots of all stripes, was willing to stake his life on the power of his faith, and he did.

Photo: Rattlesnake about to strike. Credit: iStockPhoto