Why Moms Want to 'Gobble Up' Cute Babies

//

Sometimes just holding a cute newborn will make a person say, "I want to eat you up!" New research shows that for women, there might be a biological mechanism behind that expression.

The smell of a newborn baby triggers a surge of dopamine for new moms similar to the reward response that comes with satisfying a craving for food, the study researchers found.

7 Surprising Facts About Pregnancy

A baby laughs hysterically while his father tears up pieces of paper. But what is so funny about it?

Smells are part of a network of chemical communication signals between mother and child and they can be intense, said study author Johannes Frasnelli, a postdoctoral researcher and lecturer at the University of Montreal. (7 Ways Pregnant Women Affect Babies)

"What we have shown for the first time is that the odor of newborns, which is part of these signals, activates the neurological reward circuit in mothers," Frasnelli said in a statement. "These circuits may especially be activated when you eat while being very hungry, but also in a craving addict receiving his drug. It is in fact the sating of desire."

Frasnelli and colleagues recruited two groups of women: 15 without any kids and 15 first-time moms who had given birth three to six weeks before the experiment. (The study did not include men.)

3-D Ultrasound Reveals Baby in Color

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the researchers measured the participants' brain activity as they sniffed through an olfactometer, a device that's held up to the nose to detect smells. The researchers fed the olfactometer with the odor of different infants, collected in the form of cotton undershirts worn by 18 newborns.

The women were not told what they were smelling in the experiment, and they were asked to rate how pleasant, intense and familiar each odor was.

Overall, the women in both groups rated the baby odors as weak, unfamiliar and mildly pleasant. But the moms generally had greater activity in a part of their brain linked to reward, the researchers said.