Crowds Build for Second Obama Inauguration

//
People wave American flags as people gather near the U.S. Capitol building on the National Mall for the second Inauguration ceremony of Barack Obama.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Excited crowds poured into downtown Washington on Monday for Barack Obama's second inauguration as US president, anchored on a call for America to unite despite ugly political divides.

Barack Hussein Obama will raise his right hand and place his left on Bibles once owned by Martin Luther King and Abraham Lincoln and swear the oath of office before mustering for four years threatened by strife at home and abroad.

The 44th US president, and the first African American to hold the office, launched his second term with a private swearing-in ceremony on Sunday, before basking in the full pomp of his office with public celebrations Monday.

ANALYSIS: Why Do We Need a President Anyway?

Obama, who will set the rhetorical tone for the remainder of his presidency with an inaugural address to a crowd expected to reach half a million, will headline a parade and then waltz with the first lady at glittering inaugural balls.

Bundled-up Obama supporters trekked into town to join snaking lines for Secret Service checkpoints guarding the entry to a steel-fenced secure zone around the White House and the inaugural parade route.

Armored military vehicles and parked buses blocked major roads, as part of a tight security vice which included air and river exclusion zones, road closures and a heavy presence of police and National Guard reserve troops.

The white domed US Capitol building, draped with huge Stars and Stripes, where Obama was set to take the oath of office at just before 1700 GMT, was etched against the dark pre-dawn sky with spotlights.

Temperatures were forecast for a relatively comfortable upper 30 degrees Fahrenheit (3 to 4 degrees Celcius), much warmer than the bitter chill that has had crowds shivering at some previous inaugurations.

Though the mood was festive, as revelers crammed into coffee shops and subway trains heading downtown, Obama's second inauguration lacks the sense of historic promise and hope that greeted his first term in 2009.

His political brand has been damaged by an exhausting first term battling the worst economic storm in decades and brutal partisan warfare with his Republican rivals, notably over taxes and spending.

Yet Obama, 51, has a legacy to defend, including a historic health care law and a retrenchment from draining wars abroad, and he is vowing to make good on the promise of a fairer economy, which anchored his re-election win.

PHOTOS: Vice Presidents Who Mattered Most

He signaled late Sunday, at a reception for supporters, that he would dwell on the "common good" and the "goodness, the resilience, neighborliness, the patriotism," of Americans in his address.

"What we are celebrating is not the election or the swearing in of the president, what we are doing is celebrating each other and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home," Obama said.

"And after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an America that is worthy not only of our past, but also of our future. "

Obama's senior advisor David Plouffe said Sunday that the president will ask Americans in his inaugural address to remember what unites them, rather than political divisions which have split the country down the middle.

"He is going to talk about how our founding principles and values can still guide us in today's modern and changing world," Plouffe said on the ABC News show "This Week."

"He is going to say that our political system does not require us to resolve all of our differences or settle all of our disputes, but it is absolutely imperative that our leaders try and seek common ground."

Obama, with a slight smile, took the oath Sunday in a private ceremony in the Blue Room of the White House.

Chief Justice John Roberts, who stumbled when swearing in Obama to open his first term in 2009, slowly read each line of the oath out loud, before the president repeated phrases first intoned by George Washington, 224 years ago.