Beatboxing Google Translator: DNews Nuggets

//

Beat Boxing Google: Google added another easter egg recently, but this time instead of a search term it involves Google Translate. Google Translate can now beatbox, or make percussion sounds from words. Follow the instructions below to try it! (3:00 p.m.) via Geekosystem

To make Google Translate beatbox, follow these instructions:

  1. Go to translate.google.com
  2. Copy and paste the following: “pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk pv zk bschk pv zk pv bschk zk bschk pv bschk bschk pv kkkkkkkkkk bschk bschk bschk,” without the quotes.
  3. Select the To language as German and click the little speaker in the bottom right of the text box and smile.

London Olympic Park Security Bombs: A worker at the Olympic Park in London smuggled in a fake bomb to the park without a hitch, reports USA Today. The U.K. tabloid The Sun arranged for the worker to drive the fake bomb in after the worker approached the newspaper with security concerns. He said he was thoroughly checked only when he first went into the park in the morning, not if he left and came back in later. He told The Sun, “If I had terrorist connections I could be bringing in explosives, chemicals — anything at all.” Slightly embarrassing for the organizers, which has been talking up its extreme security measures. (1:56 9.m.) via USA Today

Wind-Powered Ball Clears Land Mines: One of the many cruel statistics about land mines is they can cost as little as $3 to make, yet require 50 times that to remove –- and at great risk to removal specialists. Massoud Hassani, who grew up in Kabul, has developed a novel idea that harnesses desert winds to deal with the deadly problem. He has created $50 wind-powered balls, made of bamboo, plastic and iron, that let the breeze do the dangerous work. The spiky ball, called the Kafon, can be released into areas suspected of being mined. The balls are light enough to be blown around, but heavy enough to trigger the mines. The Kafon is still being refined, and some have found flaws in the concept, but if tweaked right, it could offer a clever way to prevent some of the estimated 15,000 deaths each year from land mines. (9:35 a.m.) via BBC

Image: iStockPhoto