Toothy Tumor Found in 1,600-Year-Old Roman Corpse: Page 2

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Archaeologists working at the site of La Fogonussa near Lleida, in Spain, have uncovered an ancient female skeleton with an odd tumor embedded with teeth hidden in her pelvis.
International Journal of Paleopathology

The tumor would not have changed her outward appearance, and researchers can't tell for certain what affect it had on her, Armentano explained.

"We suppose that, at least during a long part of her life, she was completely unaware of this tumor. Depending on the eventual complications, she could have suffered, but there" is no evidence of this, writes Armentano. "She could have died because of many other causes!"

Despite that uncertainty, historical records do indicate that this woman lived in a time period of great change. King's College London Professor Peter Heather notes in his book "The Fall of the Roman Empire" (Oxford University Press, 2006) that, by A.D. 411, Spain had been divided between groups known as the Vandals, Suevi and Alans.

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The ancient writer Hydatius wrote that the "Spaniards in the cities and forts who had survived the disasters surrendered themselves to servitude under the barbarians, who held sway throughout the provinces."

This article originally appeared on LiveScience.com.

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