Regrets? Rats Have a Few: Page 2

//

If the rat passed up a good deal — for instance, bypassing a food it liked in favor of a shorter wait time — and encountered a worse deal at the next restaurant, it would glance backward at the one it passed up. Not only that, the rat rushed through eating its chosen food, much like a regretful human would, and was more likely to take a "worse deal" in the future, the researchers said.

A landmark study has shown that through a brain to brain interface rats are able to communicate with other rats.
DCI

But the rats' behavior was only part of the story. The researchers also made electrical recordings of the rats' brains during the task, from neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex, the part of the brain that is active in human brain scans when people feel regret. Decoding these signals allowed the researchers to "read the rat's mind," Redish said.

Rodents Fear Men (Women, Not So Much)

Surprisingly, when the rats were looking back at the restaurant they ultimately passed up, their brains showed a representation of entering that restaurant — not of the food they missed. The findings suggest the animals were expressing regret over their actions, rather than just disappointment, the researchers said.

If rats can feel regret, what about other animals? Redish speculates that any mammal might be capable of the feeling, because they have many of the same brain structures as rats and humans.

"Regret is something we think of as very human and very cognitive," Redish said, but "we're seeing that the rats are much more cognitive than we thought."

More from LiveScience:

Copyright 2014 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Article originally appeared on LiveScience.