Orange-Headed Monkey Credited for SF Giants Wins

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The San Francisco Giants baseball team has been on a winning streak ever since a female orange-headed monkey with a black body (Giants colors) was born earlier this month. The monkey appears to be the team's good luck charm, according to the San Francisco Zoo, where the tiny primate and her family live.

"Things have turned literally since she's been born," Abigail

Tuller, a spokesperson for the zoo, told the Los Angeles Times. "She seems to have her

strongest powers when the Giants are behind."

The monkey is a Francois's langur, known for its mutton-chop sideburns as an adult, noisy ways and the unique look of their offspring. Infants are likely born with bright orange head fur to help their mother and other relatives find them. This fur changes to black in color after about a year.

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As the L.A. Times reports, "The orange-headed monkey was born

right before the Giants went on a three-game run to beat the St. Louis

Cardinals and advance to the World Series."

The winning streak has continued as of this writing, with the Giants clinching game 1 of the World Series. Maybe other animal-themed good luck charms are continuing for the team? The Giants' third baseman, Pablo Sandoval aka "Kung Fu Panda," hit three home runs during last night's game.

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The little female monkey does not have a name yet, so fans have been inundating the zoo's Facebook page with suggestions. So far, "Posey" (the Giants' catcher is Buster Posey) and "Scaturo" (after second baseman Marco Scutaro, who won MVP honors) appear to be the most popular.

A sign is now in front of the monkey enclosure at the zoo. It reads: "Lucky Langur lives here." The Giants logo on the sign has rub marks on it, since fans have been touching it for added good luck.

Tuller says the little orange headed primate "seems to perk up when she sees people with Giants logos on."

So far, the team itself has not visited the monkey.

"We'd like them to focus on their game," Tuller said. "They know that she's there rooting for them."

(Images: Marianne Hale)

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