Worst-Ever Everest Accident Kills At Least 12 Sherpas: Page 2

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Risks for Sherpas

For backcountry trekkers in Alaska, avalanches come with the territory.
Pavel Novak

The accident underscores the huge risks taken by sherpa guides, who carry tents, bring food supplies, repair ladders and fix ropes to help foreign climbers who pay tens of thousands of dollars to summit the peak.

More than 300 people have died on Everest since the first successful summit by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay in 1953.

Nepal's worst-ever climbing disaster happened in 1995 when a huge avalanche struck the camp of a Japanese trekking group near Mount Everest, killing 42 people, including 13 Japanese.

Climbers Head Home After Everest Brawl With Sherpas

The impoverished Himalayan country is home to eight of the world's 14 peaks over 8,000 meters.

Nepal's government has issued permits to 734 people, including 400 guides, to climb Everest this summer.

In a bid to address concerns of overcrowding on the "roof of the world," the government earlier announced plans to double the number of climbing ropes on congested ice walls near the summit of Everest to reduce congestion and risks for climbers.

Authorities have also stationed soldiers and police at Everest base camp starting this month so climbers can approach officers in case of any trouble following a brawl between commercial climbers and Nepalese guides last year.

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